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Have It Your Way

While our Janus’ face is often turned to the future, it took a brief look back to an old Burger King ad when we heard the news of a study that showed that Robots could create twice as many jobs as they destroy. It seems a bit optimistic of the World Economic Forum which says while machines and computer algorithms could displace 75 million people it could create 133 million jobs. Of course, we realize that new technology always creates in its wake social unrest and disruption. The printing press as a prelude to the Reformation, newspapers to the rise of unions, television ushering in the era of civil rights and protests that launched the end of the Vietnam war and started woman’s rights movement. While all of these innovations both technological and social have made people’s lives better, there are always those who are caught beneath the wheel of progress. And while we have no doubt that the rising tide of progress will raise many boats, what happens to those whose skills don’t fit exactly in the last lifeboat. Perhaps, social media has brought reality into our lives with an immediacy that television couldn’t match that perhaps is calling us to forge a new more compassionate version of democracy. One in which the winners don’t always have it their way, as Burger King commercials used to say, a new world in which the high tide raises all boats, not just the ones of the rich or famous.

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internet, social media, Technology

My Hero!

Oli Frost is my hero. He decided that he had gotten tired of giving his personal data away for companies to profit from so he decided to download his own data and putting it up for auction on eBay to the highest bidder. The highest bidder will get a flash drive of his personal data and the profit from the sale will be donated to the Electronic Frontier Foundation. It seems that while people have no issue with giving our data away for profit, and we are encouraged to give blood, though there is an issue with selling our selves (prostitution) or even our body parts while they are alive. Case in point, search eBay for live kidney and there are no results but search for shrunken head (no- really. Try it) and you are met with more than 20 results. Interesting that it would be acceptable that we should give away the moments that make up our lives, even our life’s blood in many cases for the profit of others but our selling ourselves in whole or part would be taboo.

Facebook, data, dataexhaust

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Pattern = Profit

Recently I heard about an NPR podcast how computers are now using big data to make predictions about our behavior. This may mean tracking the number of cars in a shopping center parking lot to see how it correlates with activities or sales in the mall. It seems that computers can watch what we do, make a prediction as to our behavior and market to us to satisfy our need before we know what we need or want. As soon as companies can begin to predict our behavior they will be there to market to us for profit. It seems that our only way for people to hold on to our humanity will be to be unpredictable. Our constancy seems to be something that will turn us into machines that the machines we create will understand.financial gain, profit, choice, big data

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The Calagari Effect

In an earlier life, I was an opera singer and one of my first roles was a small supporting role in Verdi’s “La Traviata”. I would sit in the wings and watch rehearsals and performances following another role I hoped to grow into in the future. This character enters in the third act and begins to tell the heroine a story that will change the course of her life and consequently, the opera. The moment is etched in my mind; the character enters and tries to persuade the soprano to leave her lover for the good of the lover’s family and ultimately all concerned. Actually not that moment but the moment where I thought to myself, “is he lying?” It seems that in movies, plays and many other media that we assume that when someone is speaking that they are telling the truth. We never think that like Otello (or Othello if you prefer) we are being fed a lie, and are being manipulated. Indeed the greatest examples of this is from Robert Wiene’s “The Cabinet of Dr Calagari” where in the entire story we are being told turns out to be the point of view from a man in an insane asylum and may be entirely untrue. And yet for the entirety of the story we believe what he says having no reason to doubt our tale. This Calagari effect means that we take everything as true until we are forced by circumstance to prove it true or otherwise.
This “Calagari effect” takes on new importance in this internet age. Every moment we are on the internet we are being inundated with information and yet we have no ability to validate much of it. I work with an associate in Chennai India and on a lark I googled pictures of his city. Having never been there I have to ask, is this really Chennai? If so or not, how do I know? As we rely more and more on the internet to give us experiences and help us understand the world outside of ourselves, how can we divine that we are seeing what is truly there? Perhaps the greatest gift of the internet is instilling in us the doubt of what is really there and force us to look for truth beyond the keyboard.

caligari

a scene from The Cabinet of Dr Calagari

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Is it live?

Growing up I remember seeing the Memorex commercials with Ella Fitzgerald where she would sing some impossibly high note have it recorded and the show a wine glass shattering while the viewer heard the high note with the tag line “Is it live or is it Memorex” leaving us to wonder was she singing live or did the recorded sound break the glass. It makes me think of going to see a taping of the Late Show with David Letterman some years ago. We arrived early and felt lucky to get seats close to the stage in hopes of getting good views of the guests and Dave himself. Once seated we waited for the show to begin and noticed the large amount of video monitors in our view. It seems that once the show started the cameras and staff were almost constantly blocking our view making us rely on the monitors to see what was happening.
Recently I heard an interview with the IT director of the Barclay center, the new arena in Brooklyn. He was going about how they have a new app that can be accessed only in the center allowing people access views from all the many cameras on the court around the arena. He went on to say that you can use this app to access views from around the arena, from different angles even play backs of recent plays to see if the referee made the right call. This app works through out the arena so that you could be waiting in line to buy beer and still watch the game on your tablet or phone.
It made me think about what now will pass as a live experience. If are in the same room as an event and watching it on a monitor what is the difference if we are there or hundreds of miles away? How much do we lose when live is replaced by virtual and will virtual replace a live experience? Will seeing a movie about China be the same as being there and are we really seeing it if we only see it on the screen of our laptop as we post images of what we are “seeing”
Ella-Fitzgerald-memorex

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Am I who I am?

I was sitting in on a webinar on Social Media the other day when the presenter said “You are not who you say you are – you are who Google says you are”. It reminded me of the poem – “I am not I” by Jimenez- who says he is something larger than himself. Is that true for us? If we are not who we say we are then who are we? Are we only the people who we see ourselves as or the person that other people see ? In this electronic age is there no us except as we are seen by Google?
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