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Blind Pew

“I knew you were going to say that!”, is something that my wife occasionally says to me, either due to my predictability (possibly) or (hopefully, more likely) that we have known each other for so long we know how each other thinks. This kept ringing in my ears as I read “The Isles Have Eyes” a tremendous new book by Joseph Turow. Turow details the way in which our long tail of data is being gathered, used to predict our behavior and to market to us without our knowing how much we are being manipulated. It seems that in time our phones or possibly an implanted device will tell marketers which stores we go to, what we buy and try to anticipate our needs by sending us messages either to remind us a product we have purchased before or give us coupons or discounts to persuade us to purchase a product. This may happen online but we can also be targeted in brick and mortar stores and possibly in our homes. It seems that we are turning into pawns in an electronic chess game where the winner gets our money.
Yes, the internet was going to shut down the brick and mortar stores and we were all supposed to do all our shopping online but that does not seem to be the case. Why else would brick and mortar stores go to such lengths to predict our behavior and profit from it? It seems that some brick and mortar stores are actually thriving and giving higher satisfaction than usual. If shopping is all about the experience will we want to be guided electronically through the store, like a blind man through the snow or be allowed to make our own decisions free from electronic insight?

electronic surveillance, marketing

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Uncategorized

Retail Profiling

When I was growing up outside of Chicago, I often went into the Loop to look at the architecture, see a movie or the latest show at the Art Institute. One particularly cold winter I remember my winter coat had had a rather tough time of it, after falling in slushy snow on several occasions and truth be told, I looked rather rough, knit hat pulled down to my eyebrows and proudly showing that first bit of beard. The cold and wind made me take refuge in a new lifestyle brand clothing store that had just opened. I was just warming up when I noticed a clerk who seemed to have no other job than to follow me around the store.  Everywhere I went he made sure that he was in my gaze, making it clear that I was not welcome there. This made me so uncomfortable that I soon decided the arctic Chicago weather was better than the clerk’s cold gaze.
This came back to me while reading Joseph Turow’s “The Isles Have Eyes”, a fascinating new book on big data’s effect on retailing and the future of sales in general. It seems that retailers are now tracking our transactions both through our purchases and in the store via facial recognition to create a live buyer persona to project our needs and try to fulfill them before we reach the checkout isle. While a frequent buyers program can give discounts, Turow proposes that a store could tailor your experience to the store’s needs and perception of who you are and how your presence fits into their brand. For example, if you shop at that store only occasionally but spend a lot of money the store may want to woo you. Once the store recognizes you with facial recognition, they may alert a clerk to your presence, have them approach you with suggestions all based on your buying history. They may also have other information about you, say family names or photos from social media or a recent promotion from trade papers or press- all to ensure your return to their store. While this may be a bit creepy, the opposite is even worse. Let’s say a stores database decides you are not their demographic for whatever reason. A store clerk could be sent to shadow you around the store and if deemed necessary, even call security and remove you. All from the data that has been gathered about you, whether you know it or not. It seems that in the future we can be discriminated against not only for how we appear physically but electronically.

What can you do when your data decides who you are?

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