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The future is so bright….

While taking a break from the news of the day, I found myself reflecting on the amazing changes that have been happening in our world and how much technology has changed our lives. It was then that I felt the rising tide of skepticism that seems to seep into every aspect of our thoughts. It seems that every new triumph in technology is greeted with a chorus of naysayers prophesying the end of civilization at the hands of technology. as if everything we create is hell bent on destroying us. While it is true that everything poses a risk, what ever happened to the joy of discovery, the excitement of what the future might bring? Growing up, I remember seeing the Jetsons and the promises of the new frontier while being too young to know the menace of Hal or those damn dirty apes. If we see what we look for, maybe we could look once again for the sheer wealth of amazing in the world. When things look the worst, perhaps that is the moment to take a step back and realize that, yes the world is full of challenges but with each challenge, we create new wonders with which to solve them. I believe it was Charles Kettering who wrote, “there will always a frontier where there is an open mind and a willing hand”. As we approach a new frontier- let’s not forget that the journey can be fun. Remember, the Jetsons was a comedy.

FutureRemove term: information society information societyRemove term: Technology TechnologyRemove term: personal communication personal communicationRemove term: perception perceptionRemove term: Jetsons JetsonsRemove term: Hal HalRemove term: Damn Dirty Apes Damn Dirty ApesRemove term: Planet of the Apes Planet of the ApesRemove term: Charles Kettering Charles Kettering

 

 

 

 

 

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My Kingdom for 15 minutes.

I never liked the whole idea of the Ralph Lauren polo shirts or anything with someone else’s logo on it. I guess if there was going to be something there- it should be my initials or an image of my choice though in the latter case probably better not. That idea of not being a walking billboard for someone else’s identity has never appealed to me but it seems that we are willing to trade that precious real estate with no tangible compensation. That discrediting of our value of personal value seems to approached hagiographic heights with the new service from Blippar. By installing their app. – the selfies you take will have installed around them a “halo” (Their word, not mine) that can be branded either to sites that you have an interest in or to advertisers that they prescribe for you. It seems that we have no idea of the value of our own image or digital assets and are willing to do anything for our 15 minutes of internet fame even giving our image and our data exhaust for the privilege. It seems that as Steinbeck wrote in Cannery Row, “men hungering for love destroy everything lovable about themselves”. It seems that we will sacrifice anything on the altar of social media for our fifteen minutes of binary notoriety, for a like or perhaps a connection.

Connection, Blippar, Halo, Andy Warhol, billboard, Steinbeck, Cannery Row, Ralphen Lauren, Polo, compensation, hagiographic, selfies, advertising, walking billboard, billboard,

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Do Tablets Dream of Electric Sheep?

Readers of this blog will know the high esteem that we hold Ridley Scotts “Blade Runner” and then will not be surprised that we stopped to read the article about dolls being given a formal funeral service at a funeral parlor in Japan. It seems that in Japan, many still hold to longstanding Shinto and Buddhist beliefs that all things have a soul, and so in “death” they are given the respect of a passed living being, with an acknowledged soul and spirit. While Blade Runner deals with the human looking robots possibility of having a soul, what about the items that we use every day? Many of us spend more time with our phone than we do with other people, either one person or many. My laptop has been with me for a number of years and is considered a trusted friend. When it is no longer usable, what obligation do I have to it? How often do we say, my phone or laptop died when the battery runs out? When will we learn that we have a responsibility to ourselves but also to what we create and what we create relationships with? If we didn’t, why would Britain be debating if kill switches were necessary or worth discussion? We seem to go to great pains to respect human birth (seemingly disregarding them afterward in many respects) and when and if other people do and deserve respect because of it, but what of the things we create that are not exactly like us yet. How will we react to the human robot that begs for a merciful death, will we toss it away or respect the role that it has had in our lives and inherent dignity. Perhaps we will finally be compassionate beings in the digital space when we treat a computers demise with the respect and awe that we treat the launch of the newest tablet or phone.

Blade Runner, Ridley Scott, Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, Philip K Dick, digital space, dignity, kill switches, computers, tablet, Iphone, android, Buddhism, Shintoism, Soul, Japan, funeral, Britain, human, human birth, death, disposable, planned obsolescence, digital, BBC, appreciation

What responsibility do we have to electronic creations?

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Driving to Oblivion

It was surprising to me to hear when a friend of mine had taken a job driving for Uber. Now there is nothing wrong with driving for Uber, I was surprised as my friend and I had met in college and I thought him a smart man and good student, talents not so much in demand as an Uber driver. It seems this electronic revolution, will have the same effect as the industrial revolution only on a larger scale. While the industrial revolution took skilled laborers and reduced them to a cog in an assembly line, this computer revolution seems to be doing the same for every worker. It seems that there is no skill that cannot be replaced, revised or in some way significantly downsized by computers and automation. Just as skilled craftsmen and blacksmiths were relegated to endlessly executing the same task, now college educated people are finding their jobs behind the wheel of the cars that the first revolution made possible.
They say now we are teaching our children skills for jobs that do not yet exist so that they can be ready for what is to come. Let us hope we are not giving them all driving licenses for an age of driverless cars.

Uber, Uber driver, electronic revolution, industrial revolution, automation, downsized, computers, assembly line, computer revolution, revolution, driverless cars, Driving licenses

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More, Moore, MORE!

While thinking about Moore’s Law, you may remember, it states that the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit doubles approximately every two years, with the second law being that cost would fall with each new development, I was reminded of a passage from “Big Data” by Mayer-Schonberger and Cukier about the growth of information and the ability to share it. From the advent of Arabic numerals, writing, print and so forth it seems that the pace of our ability to share and manipulate data has been getting faster not unlike Moore’s Law. The world that most of us grew up in is very different from the world that we are living in now and will, no doubt, look much different in the future. How are we to understand and relate to the world that may be changing faster than our ability to understand it. Motion picture film moves at 24 frames per second that transform single images into a fluid moving image. Will our technology begin to move so fast that the single now is transformed into a rapidly disappearing past, beyond our understanding or realization?

Moore, Big Data,

 

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Pattern = Profit

Recently I heard about an NPR podcast how computers are now using big data to make predictions about our behavior. This may mean tracking the number of cars in a shopping center parking lot to see how it correlates with activities or sales in the mall. It seems that computers can watch what we do, make a prediction as to our behavior and market to us to satisfy our need before we know what we need or want. As soon as companies can begin to predict our behavior they will be there to market to us for profit. It seems that our only way for people to hold on to our humanity will be to be unpredictable. Our constancy seems to be something that will turn us into machines that the machines we create will understand.financial gain, profit, choice, big data

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