internet, social media, Technology, Uncategorized

Last Will and Textament….

It has been disturbing to me to see the acceptance of the most informal of communications, texting, and tweeting, have become acceptable forms of communicating and I was hear that the French legal system said that the texting of a last will and testament has no legal value. Indeed, the court decreed that a texted will or texted changes to a will, had no value in a court of law. While there may be those that remember the outcry when Genesis frontman Phil Collins divorced his wife via fax, it seems that now we react more with what Conan O’Brian calls a horrorplause, the reaction in which the audience responds initially in disgust and shock to a joke and then gradually comes around and laughs and applauds. It seems with this media driven political arena we have embraced the horrorplause. We will be horrified by the statements of our political leaders only to come around and applaud and laugh as if the sitcom we had been watching had come to a close and the credits were about to roll. Perhaps the midseason elections will be the newest version of the midsummer replacement tv shows when we decide that what we are seeing is no longer interesting and that a change is no farther than a tweet or text away. People text or tweet condolences, or announcements of personal importance, but whatever happened to such a personal announcement being worthy of more than 140 characters, or at best 120 characters for the cherished retweet. Or perhaps, in our digital age popularity has become more important than sincerity.

 

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social media, Technology

Elevator Pitch

The thought that some things are too complex to be explained simply is one of the reoccurring thoughts in Adam Curtis’ brilliant “HyperNormalisation”. It seems that now we find ourselves in a world where everything must be able to be explained in 140 characters (or better 120 allowing for the precious retweet) and that the idea of complexity must be shunned at all costs. How else can we explain the prevailing descriptions of antagonists on the world stage as, Bad Dudes or Bad Hombres? It seems that our current rush to the latest technology is creating an inverse colorization in our world. We seem to have to take vibrant colorful issues and reduce them to simple almost childlike realities so that we can regurgitate them on our Twitter feeds. And since when did a tweet become an appropriate media for a condolence letter? Have our emotions become so bite-sized that they warrant no more emotional room than a postage stamp? The world is a complex and colorful place and will continue to be so in spite of our tweets full of sound and fury, signifying nothing. The world will not reduce itself to meet our small-minded needs and will only leave us behind with a handful of tweets, unable to understand.

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Uncategorized

Less and less is more

It seems that emoticons are here to stay. Indeed according to an article published in the journal Social Neuroscience they are quickly becoming a new language. I am not a big user of emoticons or emoji’s I am intrigued by the idea of using them as a form of language. It reminds me of an afternoon spent in one of my favorite book stores and coming across a book made up entirely of haiku’s strung together to form a narrative. While I guess this is common in Japan, it seems like an exercise in short form – creating a structure of a book that could be tweeted if desired. To take that one step further, Fred Berenson a research associate at NYU has decided to rewrite “Moby Dick” in emoticons. Fascinating as that may be I find myself stuck on the idea that we seem to be returning to a language of pictographs. While that seems less able to convey meaning then an alphabetic language it may be that we are less interested in conveying layers of meaning and are more interested in being concise. Maybe, in the future, Shakespeare will be surpassed by the tweet in a world where less will have to mean more.

groinstrong-word-whale

 

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